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Guild neck reset

This guitar was brought to me because the action was too high and it was hard to play. This guitar was brought to me because the action was too high and it was hard to play.
here you can see how high the strings are at the 12th fret. Here you can see how high the strings are at the 12th fret.
This photo shows the neck projection onto the bridge.    You can see here that the neck has rotated so much that the projection is below the top of the bridge.  A neck reset is in order to fix this and get the action back down. This photo shows the neck projection onto the bridge. You can see here that the neck has rotated so much that the projection is below the top of the bridge. A neck reset is in order to fix this and get the action back down.
Here you can see me using an iron to heat up the fingerboard in order to loosen the glue.  I am using my bending slats wrapped in tinfoil to protect the guitar top from the irons heat.  I should note that there is no water in the iron.  The steam comes later. Here you can see me using an iron to heat up the fingerboard in order to loosen the glue. I am using my bending slats wrapped in tinfoil to protect the guitar top from the irons heat. I should note that there is no water in the iron. The steam comes later.
I use a sharp knife and various spatulas to free the fingerboard from the top.  once again you can see I am using the steel slats to protect the top from any accidental damage. I use a sharp knife and various spatulas to free the fingerboard from the top. once again you can see I am using the steel slats to protect the top from any accidental damage.
Now the fret has to come out so I can drill down to the neck joint.  The hole will be hidden under the fret wire when it all goes back together.  I use a soldering iron to heat the fret, so it will come out clean. Now the fret has to come out so I can drill down to the neck joint. The hole will be hidden under the fret wire when it all goes back together. I use a soldering iron to heat the fret, so it will come out clean.
Here you can see the fret has come out nice and clean and I have drilled a tiny hole into the pocket of the neck joint so I can inject steam to melt the glue inside. Here you can see the fret has come out nice and clean and I have drilled a tiny hole into the pocket of the neck joint so I can inject steam to melt the glue inside.
In goes the steam!  here you can see part of my neck steaming setup.  On the guitar is a fancy jig to apply a constant pressure to the heel of the neck to encourage it's clean release with a minimum amount of steaming. In goes the steam! here you can see part of my neck steaming setup. On the guitar is a fancy jig to apply a constant pressure to the heel of the neck to encourage it's clean release with a minimum amount of steaming.
This is a homemade water trap I built to catch any condensed water in the lines before it gets to the guitar and makes things unnecessarily soggy.  Yeah it leaks a bit, so I put it in the paint can to catch the drips and keep it from tipping over.  It works surprisingly well. This is a homemade water trap I built to catch any condensed water in the lines before it gets to the guitar and makes things unnecessarily soggy. Yeah it leaks a bit, so I put it in the paint can to catch the drips and keep it from tipping over. It works surprisingly well.
A little while later and out she comes clean as can be except for a layer of old hide glue. A little while later and out she comes clean as can be except for a layer of old hide glue.
All this glue will get cleaned out before the joint has a chance to cool.  After that, the guitar gets to rest for a spell while everything drys back out.  I need the wood moisture to fully stabilize out before I go resetting the neck angle. All this glue will get cleaned out before the joint has a chance to cool. After that, the guitar gets to rest for a spell while everything drys back out. I need the wood moisture to fully stabilize out before I go resetting the neck angle.
My apologies, I must have forgotten to snap a photo of the neck going back in, but I assure you there was nothing more than a few clamps and some glue.  The neck joint was of course adjusted and refit to raise the saddle height beforehand.  Sorry no pictures there either.  In this photo you can see the new bits of cow bone that will soon become the new saddle and nut. My apologies, I must have forgotten to snap a photo of the neck going back in, but I assure you there was nothing more than a few clamps and some glue. The neck joint was of course adjusted and refit to raise the saddle height beforehand. Sorry no pictures there either. In this photo you can see the new bits of cow bone that will soon become the new saddle and nut.
The new fully compensated saddle and new bridge pins installed. The new fully compensated saddle and new bridge pins installed.
All finished.  The new action is back to factory new and this guild is ready to go home. All finished. The new action is back to factory new and this guild is ready to go home.

Thank you Don for trusting me with this beauty and thanks to everyone who took the time to read this post.  As always feel free to leave questions and comments below.

2 thoughts on “Guild neck reset”

  • jimz

    wow Andrew, that is really cool!! would that be basically the same procedure that you would use on my guitar? seems nso straight forward, you make it look easy (iam certain it is not) but very cool

    Reply
    • Andrew

      Yeah Jim that's basically it. Your guitar shouldn't be much different. Once the guitar has a chance to stabilize back out, you can see how I put it back together.

      Reply
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502 W Webster Rd. Royal Oak, MI 48073